Statements and Reviews

"Ridley represents a new wave of British artists who are aiming to re-invent and re-invigorate figurative painting. Her large-scale paintings are original and distinctive. They combine playful imagery with much darker themes – male and female sexuality, violence and decay. In this selection of works she explores the conflict between abstraction and representation, with beast-like figures inhabiting an enigmatic dream world. Recurring motifs derive from her birthplace in the Caribbean; voodoo dolls, palm trees and the sea. Combinations of interpretive reality and violent abstract shapes are played out in an artistic battle. Ridley’s confident application of paint competes for dominance with the compelling narrative, and a dark humour lurks within the whirlwind of shapes and colour. The process of warping and distorting forms forces the viewer through a range of imagined scenes that, taken together, construct a captivating tale."

Thomas Williams is the founder and director of Thomas Williams Gallery, one of London’s leading galleries specialising in contemporary and post-war paintings and works on paper.

"There is a slightly dark feel to Ridley’s paintings. Her pieces seem quite inoffensive at first glance, but on closer inspection they appear warped and twisted – as if Hieronymus Bosch and Francis Bacon had to paint a holiday postcard...like a grown-up kid’s painting. Everything crammed in, but with a post-pubescent obsession with sex and bodily functions. It’s great fun, and don’t let anyone tell you different."

Thunk Magazine.

"Pippa's drawings...are full of action and fluid street studies, melting and moving bodies and buildings: present and conversational... Something a bit wrong...heading closer to graffiti, closer to melancholy, social conscience and a more truthful plastic wobble. ...The body of work thus far has connected an inner and outer landscape (and an awareness of art history)...admitting awkwardness, bleakness and despreation sometimes, always shouting out for attempted union, dancing in celebration and bright communication."

Reference by Neal Jones

"Pippa Ridley translates the emotional fallout from damaged relationships into ironic images of a quietly corrupted Arcadia."

Signal Failure2 exhibition catalogue essay 'The Agon of Romance and Triumph: aesthetic agency through the lense of Virgil's 'Aeneid'' by Dr. Michael Delacruz.